Tenkara & Hi-Vis Orange vs Western

by Delane
(Portland, OR, USA)

Just got back from fishing the Breitenbush River in Central Oregon. My sons, grandsons and son-in-law head up there every year while the women enjoy a week at the Oregon Coast during the same week.

This year was my first outing with may Amago rod and the Orange Hi-Vis Lines. A perfect match for this river. The river was higher and faster than normal due to snow melt, but they have been planting the river with 1800 fish per week since the middle of May. Tenkara met the challenge from the very first cast and rainbows staying in most every pocket in front and behind most every large rock.

While fishing the 2nd morning on the river I was approached by a guy who was curious about may rod and techniques being used. He was pretty quick to pass judgement and could not see any advantage to the Tenkara system, so I presented him with a challenge; I pointed to a pocket about 20 feet from shore and ask him to make a drag free drift through the pocket. The first cast he made lost a fly due to brush and trees close by to our rear. After tying on another fly he tried a roll cast which the river quickly took his weighted line downstream. After a dozen tries, or so, he gave up and admitted it was impossible for him to get in to that area of water and challenged me to reach the same pocket.

An easy sling shot cast to hit the pocket, raised the rod so just the fly and a bit of the tippet was along the seam, a drag free drift and a nice 14 inch trout came to shore. The guy now wants to learn more about Tenkara.

I do love Tenkara and the Hi-Vis line can't be beat! With the fast water on a bright day and lots of white water flowing around, the orange line was visible and made hitting those pockets a whole lot easier. My western rods that I have made are now on display in my den and the Amago is near the door ready for the next trip.

Comments for Tenkara & Hi-Vis Orange vs Western

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Jul 05, 2011
The Challenge!
by: TenkaraBum

What a great story, and also what a great way to introduce a skeptical fisherman to the advantages that tenkara can provide.

I'll bet there are spots on the river where a 50-foot cast with Western gear would yield a fish that you couldn't catch with a tenkara rod, but I'll also bet there are a lot more spots that are just like the one you described - fairly close in and easily within range of a tenkara rod, where the ability to keep the line off the water puts fish in the net for a tenkara angler - fish an angler with Western gear could never catch.

Jul 05, 2011
Great post!!
by: RD Caillier

At the end of the day, doing it is always better than talking about it.

What a great story, it would have been fun to see!

I feel the best way to share our Tenkara method is by showing it to someone. My Son shared his Tenkara fishing with me and now I'm hooked.

Jul 07, 2011
I enjoyed your story!
by: Jack

I drove along the Breitenbush recently and the river seemed as high as I've seen it at this time of year. To me, the Clackamas seemed a little lower. If you ran into another fly fisher, my guess is that you must have been in or near one of the campgrounds. You're more dedicated than I am and I'm glad you did well!


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