Tenkara Midi, Soft and
White Tenkara Lines

Tenkara Midi is a hi-vis tapered tenkara line made by the Fujino line company in Japan. It is nylon, so it isn't as dense as you might want, but it casts well on a windless day. And boy, is it hi-vis!

Tenkara Midi

Takashi Yoshida, the man behind Yoshida Kebari, has to be one of the most creative tenkara anglers in Japan. He clearly does not feel bound by tradition to do things they way they've always been done. This is best known in his flies, which run the gamut from very traditional kebari tied with zenmai and a pheasant alula feather to bead head flies to bug-eyed creations (or maybe bug-eyed creatures). He is less well known for the rods he uses - largely because the bloggers and tweeters who call attention to his interesting flies are strangely mum about his use of corkless keiryu rods for tenkara fishing.

He is not just another angler, though, he is also teaches tenkara fishing and fly tying at the Tokyo Trout Center.

Yoshida san has come full circle now, and has added a thinking-out-of-the-box tenkara line to his rods and flies. This new line is called Tenkara Midi, and is essentially a knotless tapered leader adapted for tenkara fishing. The adaptations are in its length, diameter and color. The original fluorescent green line comes in 3.5, 4.0 and 4.5 meter lengths and tapers from Japanese line size 10 down to size 3. The fluorescent orange line, dubbed "Soft Tenkara" by Fujino, tapers from size 8 down to size 3. It comes in 3.3, 3.6, 4 and 5 meter lengths. Their newest line, called the White Tenkara, is similar to the soft, tapering from size 8 to size 3.

Tenkara Soft

I've written a lot about nylon's big disadvantage, which is it's low density. It's big advantage, though, is in the color you can get. The  Tenkara Midi and Soft Tenkara lines are BRIGHT. I mean they are REALLY BRIGHT. They just pop.

If you have watched any tenkara videos, you probably have noticed that you cannot see the line, no matter what line the angler is using. In the TenkaraBum video that Roamads shot, I used both the Soft Tenkara and the Midi lines and both were quite visible. If the camera can pick it up, your eyes, which are better by far, will have no problem seeing either line.

I have to say that the green Midi can get lost against a green background, as indicated in the top part of the photo to the left. Against the water, though, it is extremely visible. That is perhaps the biggest advantage to fluorescent orange lines. They are incredibly bright and don't blend into any background.

For anglers who are concerned that the brightly colored lines will scare the fish, Fujino has introduced their White Tenkara line. From the photo of the package on the Fujino site, I mistakenly thought it was an opaque line, which would have been incredibly visible. Unfortunately, it isn't opaque, it is a milky white translucent line that is certainly visible enough except when looking directly into glare.

While color is the biggest advantage that nylon has over fluorocarbon, the biggest disadvantage is the density. Nylon is not as dense as fluoro, and thus does not cast well if you have to cast into a breeze. On a windless day it is just fine. Also, the taper that is built into this line definitely helps its casting qualities. There are a couple advantages to the lower density, though. The line settles to the water more softly than fluorocarbon. Also, if you are fishing dries and you do not want your line to sink, greased nylon floats quite well.

Despite being a tapered lines, I found them to cast better on a softer rod. They would not be my first choice of line for the Daiwa Kiyose SF series or Suntech Genryuko, but for most tenkara rods they would be fine.

Tight loop with Fujino's new White Tenkara line.

It has been quite some time since I have fished with the Fujino Midi and Soft Tenkara lines. When I took the White Tenkara line out for the first time I decided I really liked it. It is visible enough to see. I didn't fish it in late evening or deep shade, when you might want to switch to the bright orange Soft Tenkara. It is also likely to be a lot more stealthy. I don't think brightly colored lines scare fish, but I know some people think they do. This line, with the sky as a background, should be almost invisible to the fish.

I was actually a bit surprised at how well the Fujino White Tenkara line casts. It may be that I have become a better caster in the last few years, but it might be the line also. I would have to fish it with the Soft Tenkara line back to back. Still, I was impressed and will certainly fish with this line and the Soft Tenkara lines more.

The lines come pretty much just like a knotless tapered leader. The tippet end of the line is just a plain end, and the first thing I would do is tie a figure 8 knot in the end of it so that the tippet can be attached the same way it is attached to a level line.

Tenkara Midi

Fujino Tenkara Midi (fluorescent green) - $15

Soft Tenkara

Fujino Soft Tenkara (fluorescent orange) - $15

White Tenkara

Fujino White Tenkara - $15

Line made in Japan.
From every sale, more than $1 goes to fisheries conservation.


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