Kiyotaki in the High Sierras

by Dennis Precourt
(Carlsbad, CA)

Golden Hybrid

Golden Hybrid

Golden Hybrid Meadow creek where Goldens grow. Shoreline structure ideal for stalking Brookies in close. Young Brown from tiny Walker Creek.

For years of fishing the back-country of California's High Sierra, I'd haul the traditional 5wt outfit to these rockbound lakes to combat the alpine winds one often encounters. But landing 8" fish on a fast-action rod did not provide a lot of enjoyment, and I didn't realize I was walking by some of the most productive water in my haste to reach the big open waters of the lakes. Those tiny inlet and outlet streams held nuggets of gold and other gems to be mined . . . I just lacked the proper tool.

Purchasing a Kiyotaki 21 last winter changed the game, and this summer I enjoyed seeing what those small waters held: pocket and pools of beautiful Golden hybrids, the juniors that eventually make their way into the lake.

Besides having hours of fun tossing midge patterns to aggressive little fish, I found having such a rod in the day pack changed my perception of viable fly water. And the experiments began . . . .

One self-inflicted misconception quickly put to rest was the notion that a fixed-line micro rod with an inherent short reach would be useless at these high lakes. But in stomping around the rockier shorelines, I had seen -- and scared -- a lot Brookies feeding on midges right on the edge. A stealthier approach began to yield lots of Kiyotaki-caught Brook trout, some which put quite a bend in the rod.

Finally, the Kiyotaki proved to be a decent tool at doing what I originally bought it for: taking precision shots at skittish Brown trout in brush-clogged creeks.

Needless to say, the Kiyotaki is always in my day pack these days, as you can't predict what perfect spot you might happen upon for this versatile -- and fun -- little rod.

Comments for Kiyotaki in the High Sierras

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Sep 27, 2013
Right On!
by: Tenkaraambassador

A great summation of the virtues of tenkara. What a great outing.

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